F4U Corsair Big Hog

F4U Corsair Big Hog Nose Art


Dimensions: 28″ x  18" Shipping $28.00.

Big Hog, the skull and crossbones, 4 Japanese flags and the American star are displayed on this Art Panel.

 

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In stock: 5

F4U Corsair Big Hog Nose Art
Flown by LT. CO.Tommy Blackburn
Dimensions: 28″ x 18"

When Blackburn saw his F4U-1A Corsair, he stared at it for a while and said it looked like a "Big Hog". The name stuck and his F4U Corsair had the name Bog Hog along with the skull and crossbones symbol. Tom Blackburn shot down 11 enemy aircraft and had 5 probable. He was a decorated combat pilot for his heroic service during World War II.

The first production Corsair flew on 25 June 1942. In September carrier landing tests were made and these were quite unsatisfactory, which then placed the F4U on a land-based status with the Marines. This proved to be a serious mistake and certainly one which negated a great deal of expensive design and development in the folding wings. Carrier operations for the F4U-1A Corsair did not start until January of 1945 After carrier-based sorties commenced the F4U truly became the leading fighter of the Navy's Pacific War effort. A total of 2140 Japanese airplanes were destroyed by the Corsair with a corresponding loss of only 189 units for the Navy and Marines.

a
Their different manufactures participated in the Corsair. Brewster built 733 units designated the F3A-1, and Goodyear built some 4,000 units designated FG-1 and FG-2. Approximately 2,000 Corsairs were used by the New Zealand Air Force and carried the British name of Corsair I, II, III, and IV.

a
Their different manufactures participated in the Corsair. Brewster built 733 units designated the F3A-1, and Goodyear built some 4,000 units designated FG-1 and FG-2. Approximately 2,000 Corsairs were used by the New Zealand Air Force and carried the British name of Corsair I, II, III, and IV.

a
The length of time in which the Corsair was in actual production was the longest of any fighter in American history. Production started early in 1942 and the last model rolled off the assembly line on Christmas Eve, 1952. This was also the last piston engine fighter built in America. During its term of use, it served under the American, British, French, Canadian, New Zealand, and Australian Flags.

Dimensions: 28″x18″ in
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